Sunday, December 18, 2011

A true LOL.. Fw: [NSFW] Alcohol + Fireworks = FAIL

This is a true LOL... B-)

Sincerely,

Robert Stretton
RBS Enterprises
1.707.444.9650
rbse@yahoo.com
http://RBSe.us

Click this link to call me on Skype:
Skype: robert.stretton

--- On Sun, 12/18/11, wrote:



Subject: [NSFW] Alcohol + Fireworks = FAIL
Date: Sunday, December 18, 2011, 12:56 AM

Ass-fireworks-fail

Posted via email from rbse's posterous

Sunday, December 4, 2011

Untitled

Happy_holidays_rbse_2011_
Happy Holidays!

Posted via email from rbse's posterous

Fw:

Happy Holidays!

Sincerely,

Robert Stretton
RBS Enterprises
1.707.444.9650
rbse@yahoo.com
http://RBSe.us

Click this link to call me on Skype:
Skype: robert.stretton

--- On Sun, 12/4/11, Robert Stretton <rstretton@gmail.com> wrote:


From: Robert Stretton <rstretton@gmail.com>
Subject:
To: "Robert Stretton" <rbse@yahoo.com>
Date: Sunday, December 4, 2011, 11:43 AM

Happy_holidays_rbse_2011_800x6
 

Posted via email from rbse's posterous

Monday, October 3, 2011

Access your files from anywhere!...

Always have your stuff when you need it with @Dropbox. 2GB account is free!

http://db.tt/eVSTKKg

Sincerely,

Robert Stretton
RBS Enterprises
1.707.444.9650
rbse@yahoo.com
http://RBSe.us

Click this link to call me on Skype:
Skype: robert.stretton

Posted via email from rbse's posterous

Access your files from anywhere!...

Always have your stuff when you need it with @Dropbox. 2GB account is free! http://db.tt/eVSTKKg

Sincerely,

Robert Stretton
RBS Enterprises
1.707.444.9650
rbse@yahoo.com
http://RBSe.us

Click this link to call me on Skype:
Skype: robert.stretton

Posted via email from rbse's posterous

Thursday, September 22, 2011

Scientists discover faster than light particles...

533793main_grb110328a_chandra

Scientists discover faster than light particles...

This is a time-lapse photo taken by the Chandra X-Ray Telescope with an exposure time of about 30 hours.

It is looking straight down the center of a galactic jet from a super-massive black hole.
What i see is X-rays falling away from the center like a spray of water which is blue.
all you see in the center is white, and beyond the white that you cannot see is most of the energy emitted.
As you fall away from the center the speed slows down from the invisible to the visible like a spray of a water jet...
That would explain the energy conversion based on how much energy gets pulled in...
The black hole is massive in comparison to it's galactic jets, but the jets are spewing most of the energy in faster than light particles.
That's the dark energy.
It's dark because it is moving faster than the speed of light and cannot be seen, and is everywhere...

You heard it hear first...

B-)

Sincerely,

Robert Stretton
RBS Enterprises
1.707.444.9650
rbse@yahoo.com
http://RBSe.us

Click this link to call me on Skype:
Skype: robert.stretton

Posted via email from rbse's posterous

Monday, August 29, 2011

Five hidden dangers of Facebook (Q&A)

1) Your information is being shared with third parties
2) Privacy settings revert to a less safe default mode after each redesign
3) Facebook ads may contain malware
4) Your real friends unknowingly make you vulnerable
5) Scammers are creating fake profiles

Read more:

===
Facebook is great, but protect yourself...

Sincerely,

Robert Stretton
RBS Enterprises
1.707.444.9650
rbse@yahoo.com
http://RBSe.us

Click this link to call me on Skype:
Skype: robert.stretton

Posted via email from rbse's posterous

Thursday, August 25, 2011

Sunspot Breakthrough...

Sunspot Breakthrough

The start of an Early Warning System for destructive solar flares...

Sincerely,

Robert Stretton
RBS Enterprises
1.707.444.9650
rbse@yahoo.com
http://RBSe.us

Click this link to call me on Skype:
Skype: robert.stretton

Posted via email from rbse's posterous

Monday, August 15, 2011

rbse.us/freewifi

I just started a HotSpot in my neighborhood...
If you are ever in the neighborhood connect to "rbse.us/freewifi" with your wifi device...

(I can set you up with one too if you like... Call me...)

B-)

Sincerely,

Robert Stretton
RBS Enterprises
1.707.444.9650
rbse@yahoo.com
http://RBSe.us

Click this link to call me on Skype:
Skype: robert.stretton

Posted via email from rbse's posterous

Monday, July 11, 2011

I'm sorry to announce the passing of my sister Terrylynne Stretton...

I'm sorry to announce the passing of my sister Terrylynne Stretton...
My sister died in her sleep on 6/28/2011 so she felt no pain.
Although she was in a lot of pain lately.

She survived by her 3 sons Luther, Tony, Mike, and her daughter Chante
I have made a memorial website for her at:

Sincerely,

Robert Stretton
RBS Enterprises
1.707.444.9650
rbse@yahoo.com
http://RBSe.us

Click this link to call me on Skype:
Skype: robert.stretton

Posted via email from rbse's posterous

Thursday, April 21, 2011

FREE 2Gb virtual harddrive! Share files and folders with all your devices...

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Simple sharing

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Dropbox mobile

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Use this link to sign-up so I get credit, thanks:

http://db.tt/XxRqmUD

Sincerely,

Robert Stretton
RBS Enterprises
1.707.444.9650
rbse@yahoo.com
http://RBSe.us

Click this link to call me on Skype:
Skype: robert.stretton

Posted via email from rbse's posterous

UCLA researchers now 1 step closer to controlled engineering of nanocatalysts...

Public release date: 19-Apr-2011

Contact: Wileen Wong Kromhout
wwkromhout@support.ucla.edu
310-206-0540
University of California - Los Angeles

UCLA researchers now 1 step closer to controlled engineering of nanocatalysts

Currently, some 20 percent of the world's industrial production is based on catalysts — molecules that can quicken the pace of chemical reactions by factors of billions. Oil, pharmaceuticals, plastics and countless other products are made by catalysts.

Many are hoping to make current catalysts more efficient, resulting in less energy consumption and less pollution. Highly active and selective nanocatalysts, for example, can be used effectively in efforts to break down pollution, create hydrogen fuel cells, store hydrogen and synthesize fine chemicals. The challenge to date has been developing a method for producing nanocatalysts in a controlled, predictable way.

In a move in this direction, Yu Huang, an assistant professor of materials science and engineering at the UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science, and her research team have proposed and demonstrated a new approach to producing nanocrystals with predictable shapes by utilizing surfactants, biomolecules that can bind selectively to certain facets of the crystals' exposed surfaces.

Their new study can be found online in the journal Nature Chemistry.

At the nanoscale, the physical and chemical properties of materials depend on the materials' size and shape. The ultimate goal has been to rationally engineer materials to achieve programmable structures and predictable properties, thereby producing the desired functions. Yet shaped nanocrystals are still generally synthesized by trial-and-error, using non-specific molecules as surfactants — a result of the inability to find appropriate molecules to control crystal formation.

Huang's team's innovative new work could change that, potentially leading to the ability to rationally produce nanocatalysts with desired shapes and, hence, catalytic properties.

"In our study, we were able to identify specific biomolecules — peptide sequences, in our case — which can recognize a desired crystal surface and produce nanocrystals exposed with a particular surface to control the shape," said Chin-Yi Chiu, a UCLA Engineering graduate student and lead author of the study.

"Facet-specific biomolecules can be used to direct the growth of nanocrystals, and most importantly, now we can do it in a predictable fashion," said Huang, senior author of the study. "This is still a first step, but we have overcome the challenges by finding the most specific and selective peptide sequences through a rational selection process."

Huang's team accomplished this by using a phage library that generated a pool of peptide sequences. The team was then able to identify the selectivity of peptide sequences on different crystal surfaces. The next step, the researchers say, is to figure out what exactly is happening on the interface and to be able to describe the characterizations of the interface.

"We don't know the molecular details yet — that's like the holy grail of molecular biomimetics," Huang said. "Take the catalyst, for example. If we can predict the synthesized catalyst for just one surface, it could have much more improved activity and selectivity. We are still in the initial phase of what we really want to do, which is to see whether or not we can eventually program the synthesis of material structures."

"It's always been a personal interest to learn from the natural evolutionary selection process and apply it to research," Chiu said. "It is especially satisfying to be able to engineer a rational selection process for nanoscale materials to create nanocrystals with desired shapes."

###

The study was funded by the U.S. Office of Naval Research; the U.S. Army Research Office, through the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE); and a Sloan Research Fellowship.

The UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science, established in 1945, offers 28 academic and professional degree programs and has an enrollment of almost 5,000 students. The school's distinguished faculty are leading research to address many of the critical challenges of the 21st century, including renewable energy, clean water, health care, wireless sensing and networking, and cybersecurity. Ranked among the top 10 engineering schools at public universities nationwide, the school is home to seven multimillion-dollar interdisciplinary research centers in wireless sensor systems, nanoelectronics, nanomedicine, renewable energy, customized computing, and the smart grid, all funded by federal and private agencies.

For more news, visit the UCLA Newsroom and follow us on Twitter.

Sincerely,

Robert Stretton
RBS Enterprises
1.707.444.9650
rbse@yahoo.com
http://RBSe.us

Click this link to call me on Skype:
Skype: robert.stretton

Posted via email from rbse's posterous

Saturday, December 25, 2010

Fw: TU scientists in Nature: Better control of building blocks for quantum computer...

Sincerely,

Robert Stretton
RBS Enterprises
1.707.444.9650
rbse@yahoo.com
http://RBSe.us


--- On Sat, 12/25/10, Robert Stretton <rbse@yahoo.com> wrote:


From: Robert Stretton <rbse@yahoo.com>
Subject: TU scientists in Nature: Better control of building blocks for quantum computer...
To: "Robert B Stretton" <rbse@yahoo.com>
Date: Saturday, December 25, 2010, 9:19 AM

TU scientists in Nature: Better control of building blocks for quantum computer

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Featured In: Industry News

EurekAlert | Thursday, December 23, 2010

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Scientists from the Kavli Institute of Nanoscience at Delft University of Technology and Eindhoven University of Technology in The Netherlands have succeeded in controlling the building blocks of a future super-fast quantum computer. They are now able to manipulate these building blocks (qubits) with electrical rather than magnetic fields, as has been the common practice up till now. They have also been able to embed these qubits into semiconductor nanowires. The scientists' findings have been published in the current issue of the science journal Nature (23 December).

Spin

A qubit is the building block of a possible, future quantum computer, which would far outstrip current computers in terms of speed. One way to make a qubit is to trap a single electron in semiconductor material. A qubit can, just like a normal computer bit, adopt the states '0' and '1'. This is achieved by using the spin of an electron, which is generated by spinning the electron on its axis. The electron can spin in two directions (representing the '0' state and the '1' state).

















Electrical instead of magnetic

Until now, the spin of an electron has been controlled by magnetic fields. However, these field are extremely difficult to generate on a chip. The electron spin in the qubits that are currently being generated by the Dutch scientists can be controlled by a charge or an electric field, rather than by magnetic fields. This form of control has major advantages, as Leo Kouwenhoven, scientist at the Kavli Institute of Nanoscience at TU Delft, points out: 'These spin-orbit qubits combine the best of both worlds. They employ the advantages of both electronic control and information storage in the electron spin.'

















Nanowires

There is another important new development in the Dutch research: the scientists have been able to embed the qubits (two) into nanowires made of a semiconductor material (indium arsenide). These wires are of the order of nanometres in diameter and micrometres in length. Kouwenhoven: 'These nanowires are being increasingly used as convenient building blocks in nanoelectronics. Nanowires are an excellent platform for quantum information processing, among other applications.'

Sincerely,

Robert Stretton
RBS Enterprises
1.707.444.9650
rbse@yahoo.com
http://RBSe.us

Posted via email from rbse's posterous

Saturday, December 4, 2010

The world's first HIDE-ENGINE... [[ - GetLost - ]]


~[ http://RBSe.us/getlost ]~

[[ - GetLost - ]]

The world's first HIDE-ENGINE...

"It's Nonexploratory!"

( We are not resposible for what you may find by using this link. )
If you want to be randomly teleported elsewhere in cyberspace...

Click -[ ''HIDE-ENGINE'' ( random portal ) - CLICK HERE - ]- Here

Since 1999... B-)


Sincerely,

Robert Stretton
RBS Enterprises
1.707.444.9650
rbse@yahoo.com
http://RBSe.us

Posted via email from rbse's posterous

Sunday, October 31, 2010

VOID my previous post about KAEF-TV...

VOID my previous post about KAEF-TV...
It was a big misunderstanding.
Ray, the engineer, uses a cellphone in the office.
My call was dropped not ignored.
Working on a solution to my reception problem.


Sincerely,

Robert Stretton
RBS Enterprises
1.707.444.9650
rbse@yahoo.com
http://RBSe.us

Posted via email from rbse's posterous